Organización Internacional del Bambú y el Ratán

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Estimating biomass production and carbon storage for a fast-growing makino bamboo (Phyllostachys makinoi) plant based on the diameter distribution model

Artículos

Revista/Conferencia:

FOREST ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

Language:

English

Autor:

Ji YiJia; Lee JoouShian

Experts:

Yen TianMing

Año:

2010

Volumen:

260

Edición:

3

Número de páginas:

339-344

Palabras claves:

Carbon storage; Makino bamboo (Phyllostachys makinoi); Diameter distribution model; Weibull distribution function

The purpose of this study was to estimate biomass and carbon storage for a fast-growing makino bamboo (Phyllostachys makinoi) The study site was located in central Taiwan and the makino bamboo plantation had a stand density of 21191 +/- 4107 culms ha(-1) A diameter distribution model based on the Weibull distribution function and an allometric model was used to predict aboveground biomass and carbon storage For an accurate estimation of carbon storage, the percent carbon content (PCC) in different sections of bamboo was determined by an elemental analyzer The results showed that bamboos of all ages shared a similar trend, where culms displayed a carbon storage of 47 49-47.82%, branches 45 66-46.23%, and foliage 38 12-44 78% In spite of the high density of the stand, the diameter distribution of makino bamboo approached a normal distribution and aboveground biomass and carbon storage were 105 33 and 49 81 Mg ha(-1). respectively Moreover, one-fifth of older culms from the entire stand were removed by selective cutting If the distribution of the yield of older culms per year was similar to the current stand, the yields of biomass and carbon per year would be 21 07 and 9 89 Mg ha(-1) year(-1) An astonishing productivity was observed, where every 5 years the yield of biomass and carbon was equal to the current status of stockings Thus, makino bamboo has a high potential as a species used for carbon storage (C) 2010 Elsevier B V All rights reserved