International Bamboo and Rattan Organization

International Bamboo and Rattan Organization

Advanced search

-
Back

Changes in soil carbon and nitrogen stocks followed the conversion from secondary forest to Chinese fir and Moso bamboo plantations

Articles

Journal/Conference:

CATENA

Language:

English

Author:

Tang Xiaolu; Zhao Jiancheng; Peng Chao

Experts:

Guan Fengying; Fan Shaohui

Year:

2015

Volume:

133

Pages:

455-460

Keywords:

Land use change; Soil carbon and nitrogen stocks; C/N ratio; Secondary forest; Plantation

Land use change is the second main reason for carbon (C) emissions after fossil fuel combustion, and it is recognized as an important driving force for soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil nitrogen (N) dynamics. Conversion of the secondary forest to Chinese fir (Cunninghamia ianceolata [Lamb.] Hook) and Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycle [Carr] Mitford cv. Pubescens) plantations represents one of the most important land use changes in subtropical China. However, the effects of these land use changes on the SOC and N stocks were not well documented. Therefore, in this study soil samples were collected in a secondary forest, a 17-year Chinese fir and a 18-year Moso bamboo plantation after the conversion from the secondary forest in November 2013, and total SOC and N concentrations were measured. Total SOC and N concentrations decreased with soil depth over the 0-50 cm in three land uses, and they were significantly higher in the secondary forest than those of Chinese fir and Moso bamboo plantations; however, these concentrations were not significantly different between Chinese fir and Moso bamboo plantations. Top soil (0-10 cm) stored one third of total SOC and N stocks. SOC and N stocks in the secondary forest were significantly higher than those of Chinese fir and Moso bamboo plantations with values of 203.68, 12734 and 118.25 t. ha(-1) for SOC stock and 924, 5.10 and 635 t. ha(-1) for N stock. The results indicated that converting the secondary forest to Chinese fir and Moso bamboo plantations significantly decreased the SOC and N stocks over 0-50 cm. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.