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Multi-locus plastid phylogenetic biogeography supports the Asian hypothesis of the temperate woody bamboos (Poaceae: Bambusoideae)

Articles

Journal/Conference:

MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETICS AND EVOLUTION

Language:

English

Author:

Zhang XianZhi; Zeng ChunXia; Haevermans Thomas; Zhang YuXiao; Zhang LiNa; Guo ZhenHua

Experts:

Ma PengFei; Li DeZhu

Year:

2016

Volume:

96

Pages:

118-129

Keywords:

Arundinarieae; Biogeography; Multi-locus plastid phylogeny; Divergence time; Rapid radiation; Bambusoideae

In this paper we investigate the biogeography of the temperate woody bamboos (Arundinarieae) using a densely-sampled phylogenetic tree of Bambusoideae based on six plastid DNA loci, which corroborates the previously discovered 12 lineages (I-XII) and places Kuruna as sister to the Chimonocalamus Glade. Biogeographic analyses revealed that the Arundinarieae diversified from an estimated 12 to 14 Mya, and this was followed by rapid radiation within the lineages, particularly lineages IV, V and VI, starting from c. 7-8 Mya. It is suggested that the late Miocene intensification of East Asian monsoon may have contributed to this burst of diversification. The possibilities of the extant Sri Lankan and African temperate bamboo lineages representing ‘basal elements’ could be excluded, indicating that there is no evidence to support the Indian or African route for migration of temperate bamboo ancestors to Asia. Radiations from eastern Asia to Africa, Sri Lanka, and to North America all are likely to have occurred during the Pliocene, to form the disjunct distribution of Arundinarieae we observe today. The two African lineages are inferred as being derived independently from Asian ancestors, either by overland migrations or long-distance dispersals. Beringian migration may explain the eastern Asian-eastern North American disjunction. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.